October 2018

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10/02/2018 - 4:45am
 
 
 
 
 
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Draconids Meteor Shower 10/08 to 09/2018, 12:00am - 12:00am
 
 
 
 
 
10/08/2018 - 10:47pm
 
 
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10/16/2018 - 1:02pm
 
 
 
The Grand Conjure Conference 10/19 to 21/2018, 10:30am - 11:00pm
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The Grand Conjure Conference 10/19 to 21/2018, 10:30am - 11:00pm
 
 
 
10/24/2018 - 11:45am
 
 
 
 
Orionids Meteor Shower 10/21 to 22/2018, 12:00am - 12:00am
 
 
 
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10/31/2018 - 11:40am
 
 
 
 
Add to My Calendar

October 2018

8 events

Draconids Meteor Shower

Anonymous's picture

The radiant point for the Draconid meteor shower almost coincides with the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon in the northern sky. That’s why the Draconids are best viewed from the Northern Hemisphere. The Draconid shower is a real oddity, in that the radiant point stands highest in the sky as darkness falls. That means that, unlike many meteor showers, more Draconids are likely to fly in the evening hours than in the morning hours after midnight. This shower is usually a sleeper, producing only a handful of languid meteors per hour in most years.

10/08 to 09/2018, -

The Grand Conjure Conference

Angela Krout's picture

The Grand Conjure Conference, (sponsored by Heart of the Bear Grove, a 501(c)3) is a grassroots pagan conference that showcases paganism on a large scale, at an indoor venue, not a camping retreat. It is a way for pagans to come together, in a lovely setting, to network and learn!

So, I bet you want to know who we are, and what we’re doing. Well we’re looking to arrange a Pagan Conference in the Kansas City area, in the fall of 2018. Indoors. At a hotel. With speakers, workshops, and entertainment.  Because, let's face it, not all pagans like to camp, or can camp. 

10/19 to 21/2018, -
MO, Kansas City, 64111, TBD

Orionids Meteor Shower

Anonymous's picture

This shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The Orionids are meteors left behind in the wake of Halley’s Comet. The nearly full moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

10/21 to 22/2018, -

October 2018

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